Peer  Feedback

Peer feedback is a key to a team's performance. Use these HRDQ tools for peer feedback.



What is your coaching style

Understanding personal style is the first step to developing successful coaching relationships. By responding to the 18-item What's My Coaching Style? inventory and receiving feedback from coachees, participants identify their personal style and build an understanding of the people they coach.

What's My Coaching Style is training assessment for management development that measures personality style and explores how it relates to coaching and interpersonal relationships. Coaches and managers identify and understand personality traits, learn how to capitalize on personal strengths, and minimize potential weaknesses.

Personality, or personal style, plays a role in all facets of organizational life from leadership to communication, and coaching is no exception. Understanding how personal style affects behavior is an important first step in developing the rapport that leads to successful coaching relationships.

What's My Coaching Style is an effective training tool for identifying personal coaching style. Accurate, easy to use, and apply, the assessment measures an individual's preference for one or more basic behavioral styles: Direct, Spirited, Considerate and Systematic. With this knowledge, individuals can better understand why they behave the way they do, learn how to adapt their behavior to improve interpersonal relationships, develop rapport, and ultimately, become more effective coaches.  

Learning Outcomes:Identify personal preference for one of four behavioral styles.

Develop an awareness of personal behavior patterns.Learn how one is viewed by those he or she coaches.

Create an action plan to immediately apply in the workplace.

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Click here to visit HRDQ The Project Leadership Assessment is an innovative learning instrument that focuses on the necessary "people skills" by evaluating behavior in five vital skill areas. Go to HRDQ: Click here to visit HRDQ


Center boss

Help reduce turnover and foster better boss-employee relationships with the Best Boss Inventory. The instrument provides a model for emulating the traits of "best" bosses, giving individuals insights into their behaviors in leading, motivating, and inspiring their employees. Use the Best Boss Inventory for the HRDQ peer feedback to: Click here to visit HRDQ


The Supervisory Skills Questionnaire is a comprehensive and practical assessment tool that helps supervisors to focus on the 5 most critical skills for effective supervision: Guiding the Work, Organizing the Work, Developing Your Staff, Managing Performance, and Managing Relations. 

Supervisory Skills Questionnaire is a management development assessment for supervisory skills training. Measures supervisory skills and improves management skills for supervisors, managers, and leaders. 

The best employees don't always make the best supervisors. At least, not without the proper training. New supervisors can be overwhelmed by the often-conflicting demands of customers, management, and their coworkers-turned-employees. 

The Supervisory Skills Questionnaire is a comprehensive and practical assessment tool that helps supervisors understand how they rate against 5 skills critical for effective supervision: Guiding the Work, Organizing the Work, Developing Your Staff, Managing Performance, and Managing Relations.

Learning Outcomes:Identify skill strengths and weaknesses. Improve proficiency in 5 key skill areas. Learn which actions every supervisor should avoid. Understand the keys to effective planning, prioritizing, and delegating. Build productive relationships with other work groups Theory and Development.

The research on effective supervision identifies numerous skills that a supervisor should possess. The Supervisory Skills 

Questionnaire organizes these skills into 5 categories:

1. Guiding the Work Taking the direction of the organization and translating it into actionable plans for the work group.

2. Organizing the Work Assigning people, equipment, and tasks to meet work goals.

3. Developing Your Staff Actively working to increase the skill level of each employee being supervised.

4. Managing Performance Removing the obstacles to better performance so employees can meet their own and the organization's objectives.

5. Managing Relations Developing and maintaining good relationships with other groups so that the supervisor's employees and the organization meet their goals. The ability to balance the goals of the organization with the needs of the work group is the common thread that runs through all of the skill dimensions. 

Uses for the Assessment

Perfect for both individual and group supervisory training, the Supervisory Skills Questionnaire can be particularly helpful in surfacing issues within existing situations. Some appropriate uses include:

Prepare new supervisors for their changing roles and responsibilities
Gauge an individual's degree of readiness for a supervisory position 
Centerpiece of a comprehensive supervisory training program

Refresher course for more experienced supervisors Mentoring tool for experienced supervisors to discuss situations with new supervisors Discussion starter in any supervisory training

Post-training assessment tool

How It Works

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Supervisors respond to 30 everyday situations, choosing one of 3 possible response actions. Their responses reveal a score in each of five supervisory-skill areas, as well as an overall supervisory score.

The Supervisory Skills Questionnaire also offers a peer feedback component that reveals how the supervisors' employees view them. With this information, individuals are able to create an action plan to maximize strengths and develop skills in their weakest dimensions.

If you plan to use the Supervisory Skills Questionnaire for classroom training, we recommend you allow approximately 1 hour for interpretation of scores, topic discussion, debrief, and action planning. 

The Supervisory Skills Questionnaire Facilitator Guide includes everything you need to lead a successful training session from comprehensive background information and activities, to reproducible handouts and even a professional PowerPoint presentation. The Facilitator Guide also offers an easy-to-follow workshop outline that expands the Supervisory Skills Questionnaire into a 2.5-hour program.


The Leader-Manager Profile enables both your managers and your organization to achieve success. This 36-item assessment illustrates for managers how their competence as both a manager and a leader can contribute to meeting the demands of the marketplace. 

Today's business environment demands that all managers effectively display both leadership and management skills. However, managers often aren't clear on what distinguishes these competencies — or how to balance these two different yet complementary skill sets.

The Leader-Manager Profile enables both your managers and your organization to achieve success. This 36-item assessment illustrates for managers how their competence as both a manager and a leader can contribute to meeting the demands of the marketplace. Learning Outcomes: 

Clarify the differences between leading and managing Pinpoint the skills needed to be effective in each role Understand how to balance and improve the 2 skills sets Theory

The Leader-Manager Profile is based on the works of several well-known management experts including Bennis, Kotter, Kouzes, Posner, and others. The model for the assessment exemplifies both leadership and management skills and competencies. 

How It Works 

The assessment presents 36 statements pertaining to either managing or leading. After scoring is complete, participants create a profile by plotting their leadership and management scores (as well as sub scores for 6 individual competencies) on charts. Feedback scores from associates provide a side-by-side comparison. Finally, an action planning activity, worksheet, and reflection questions provide a framework for improvement.

Uses for the Leader-Manager Profile

The Leader-Manager Profile is effective when used as a stand-alone instrument as well as a component of a larger management or leadership training program. Click here to visit HRDQ


Performance Management Through 5 Key Conversations is designed to help managers identify their skill level in engaging employees in 5 key types of performance-related conversations.

Manage the development of high-performing employees through collaborative and constructive dialogue. By engaging employees daily in meaningful, performance-related conversations, managers build relationships and get results in a less awkward, more productive atmosphere. 

Performance Management Through 5 Key Conversations is designed to help managers identify their skill level in engaging employees in 5 key types of performance-related conversations. The instrument allows managers to create a profile of skill level in each of the 5 Key Conversations (comparing self assessment with peer feedback), providing insight on the areas for improvement.

Learning Outcomes 

Identify conversational areas in need of development Compare perceptions with valuable feedback from direct reports Develop vital performance-related conversational skills Theory 

Performance Management Through 5 Key Conversations is based on a review of relevant literature on performance management and coaching as well as the authors' extensive experience working closely with line managers in global companies. 

Each of the 5 Key Conversations between a manager and employee lead to clarity in direction and shared ownership. The quality of these conversations is determined by the extent to which mutual understanding is reached. Thus, the manager's ability to listen, probe, and clarify are essential skills underlying all 5 conversations.

How It Works 

The assessment presents 30 statements regarding current practices as a manager in developing high-performing employees. In scoring the assessment, participants determine their Overall Performance Management Score. In addition, participants create a self-profile showing scores for each of the 5 conversations. Feedback forms submitted by peers provide the data to create a second — or "feedback" — profile. Finally, to prepare for meeting with employees, participants complete worksheets on each of the 5 conversations.

Uses for Performance Management Through 5 Key Conversations 

Performance Management Through 5 Key Conversations is effective when used alone or as part of a management development program (flexible enough to be used at various stages). The instrument can be used in the following ways: 

To establish a new approach to performance management in an organization. To provide basic skills in performance management for new managers or supervisors. To suggest an alternate or complementary approach to existing performance management techniques being used in an organization. If the Feedback Form is used, the manager should have at least 90 days of experience managing his/her employees. It is ideal if the manager has been through a performance review process with the employees who complete the Feedback Form.

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Negotiating Style Profile offers a simple framework for determining one's negotiating style and the likely effect of that style in a negotiating situation. Ultimately, participants will learn to focus on those skills and methods that are likely to produce synergistic outcomes. 

The Negotiating Style Profile is a win-win, collaborative negotiating assessment for employee and management development training to improve negotiating skills. The assessment identifies a preference for 1 of 5 negotiating styles based on the William Ury and Roger Fisher's win-win model of negotiating, and the Thomas-Kilmann conflict resolution model.

Negotiating is a skill that everyone can use, regardless of whether or not it is part of a formal job requirement. One of the challenges, though, is that not everyone negotiates in the same way. We each have a personal negotiating style that influences how we approach and engage the process. By being aware of their negotiating style, individuals will be in a better position to acquire good negotiating skills. 

The Negotiating Style Profile is a great starting point. Based on Ury and Fisher's collaborative win-win model, and heavily influenced by the Kilmann-Thomas conflict resolution model, The Negotiating Style Profile offers a simple framework for determining one's negotiating style and the likely effect of that style in a negotiating situation. Both professionals and non-professionals will find the Negotiating Style Profile to be a valuable tool for improving negotiating skills. First, individuals identify their preference for 1 of 5 negotiating styles: Defeating, Accommodating, Collaborating, Withdrawing, or Compromising. Next, observer feedback provides valuable insight from peers. Finally, they learn how to use this knowledge to focus on the skills and methods that are likely to produce synergistic outcomes.

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Learning Outcomes, Theory and Development, Uses for the Assessment, How it Works, What to Order & Related Products.

Learning Outcomes: Understand 5 styles of negotiating. Identify personal negotiating characteristics. Learn why a win-win approach is most effective. Gather peer feedback about one's negotiating style. Theory and Development 

The Model of Negotiating Styles at the center of Negotiating Style Profile is based on relevant literature on negotiating practices, including Getting to Yes, by Roger Fisher and William Ury. These sources reveal that concerns for both the outcome of the negotiation and for the relationship appear to represent the most important behaviors a negotiator can employ in an actual negotiation. The Negotiating Style Profile also references the research of Thomas and Kilmann (1976) because the negotiating model bears similarities to the conflict resolution process, which suggests that a particular resolutions style can be predicted based upon a person's willingness to confront issues and willingness to see all points of view. The Thomas-Kilmann model describes five pure styles for conflict resolution. This same approach can be used to describe the five styles of negotiating behavior. Drawing from the literature on conflict resolution, it is clear that a negotiator cannot be effective in both the short and long terms if he or she emphasizes one set of concerns to the exclusion of the other.

Although variations of each of the 5 Characteristic Negotiating Styles may be appropriate under certain conditions, it is suggested that a consistent application of the Collaborate style offers the greatest probability of producing the highest quality negotiating results and the most enduring satisfaction to the parties involved.

Download the complete Theoretical Background.

Uses for the Assessment

The Negotiating Style Profile is appropriate for anyone involved in negotiations. It is flexible enough to be used as a stand-alone instrument or as a component in a larger negotiating, communication, or leadership program.

How It Works

Negotiating Style Profile assessment is a good foundational tool for negotiating skills development. It is most effective when administered, scored, and interpreted before any formal negotiation skills training begins. Once individuals are aware of their own negotiating style, they can learn to negotiate effectively by acquiring good negotiating skills. Using the Participant Guide, individuals create 2 profiles. The first profile is based on an assessment of their own preferences for one of 5 negotiating styles: Defeat, Withdraw, Accommodate, Compromise, or Collaborate. The optional second profile, based on scores compiled from the Observer Feedback Form, provides additional insight, as many people who think they are collaborative learn that their associates may disagree.

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The Problem Solving Style Inventory (PSSI) ia a 30-item instrument, which allows individuals to gain insight on their dominant and supportive styles of solving problems and making decisions in their work units or teams as well as receive feedback from others. 

Do your managers and supervisors resist involving their employees in the problem-solving process — even when a participative approach is the most appropriate? Help them to learn whether their problem-solving and decision-making preferences work to their benefit or their detriment with the Problem Solving Style Inventory.

This 30-item instrument allows individuals to gain insight on their dominant and supportive styles of solving problems and making decisions in their work units or teams as well as receive feedback from others.

Learning Outcomes Understand which problem-solving and decision-making style one is predisposed to use or ignore Determine whether one's use of the 5 styles is appropriate for one's work groups or teams Identify the important factors to consider when choosing a style to solve a problem or make a decision Master the ability to assess one's work group and choose the style that fits best Theory

Problem Solving Style Inventory is based on the Problem Solving Styles Model. This model illustrates the various styles available to a supervisor or manager for solving problems and making decisions. A manager's problem-solving or decision-making behavior can be plotted along 2 axes:

Ego-Centered Behavior: The extent to which a manager attempts to solve all problems or make all decisions by him/herself with little or no input from others.

Other-Centered Behavior: The extent to which a manager includes other people in the problem-solving or decision-making process.

The degree to which a manager uses these 2 behaviors to solve problems and make decisions gives rise to the 5 styles shown in the model. All 5 styles are useful managerial approaches to solving problems and making decisions in certain situations.

How It Works

The inventory presents 30 pairs of statements that describe how people go about solving problems and making decisions. Individuals choose the statement that is most characteristic of their approach. By scoring and charting results, participants generate an overall Problem-Solving/Decision-Making Style Preference Profile, with sub scores indicating one's usage level of each of the 5 styles. Feedback scores provide comparison data. Participants learn about the styles, the 4 key factors in choosing a style, analyze the possible overuse or underuse of each style, and make action plans.

Uses for the Problem Solving Style Inventory

The Problem Solving Style Inventory assessment and Feedback Forms are effective when used together as a stand-alone tool as well as part of a larger program. The Problem Solving Style Inventory can be used in a variety of ways, including:

As part of a basic supervisory or management training program As part of a leadership or team leader training program As a development tool used by a higher-level manager to coach lower-level managers or supervisors in when and how to ask for participation in problem solving and decision making As an individual self-assessment tool to help a manager identify his/her own use of the 5 problem-solving and decision-making styles as seen through the manager's eyes and eyes of his/her employees As a diagnostic tool with dysfunctional teams or work units to assess whether the team leader's or manager's over-use or under-use of any of the 5 styles might be a contributing factor to the ineffectiveness of the team or work unit. 

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How do you develop leaders with visionary qualities — those who possess knowledge of themselves, those they lead, their organizations, and the world?

The Comprehensive Leader is a powerful tool, measuring the behaviors that indicate strength or weakness in those 4 key areas. Through a 40-item assessment, participants gain new insights into their leadership behavior — and their untapped potential — and learn how to put visionary leadership into practice. Learning Outcomes

Learn the concept of visionary leadership Identify strengths of strategic and visionary leadership Gain insight on how others perceive leadership behavior Theory

The Comprehensive Leader is based on extensive research of the relevant literature on leadership. The foundation of the Model of Comprehensive Leadership is active knowledge — knowledge that is in constant development and consistently provides the basis for leadership behavior. The Model of Comprehensive Leadership captures the dimensions of leadership knowledge necessary for visionary leadership.

The leadership dimensions of the model are depicted in a series of concentric circles to convey the distinct yet increasingly expansive nature of each field of knowledge. The key to visionary leadership rests in expanding knowledge in all dimensions and acting on that knowledge.

How It Works

The assessment presents 40 statements pertaining to current leadership behavior. After scoring is complete, participants create a profile by plotting their sub scores in the 4 dimensions of leadership on charts. Feedback scores from associates provide a side-by-side comparison. Participants then review the 15 possible leadership profiles. Finally, thought-provoking questions encourage individuals to find insight from the assessment results and take action for improvement.

Uses for The Comprehensive Leader A variety of leaders can benefit from the instrument, including team or department leaders, middle managers, and senior-level contributors. As with all HRDQ assessments, The Comprehensive Leader is effective as a stand-alone instrument or as a component of a larger training initiative — flexible enough to be used at various stages of a leadership development program.

The instrument can also be used as a complement to other leadership models. Ideas for building bridges between The Model of Comprehensive Leadership and other popular leadership models are presented in the Facilitator Guide.

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The Team Leader Survey provides leaders or potential leaders of self-managing teams with the opportunity to gain a clear understanding of their skill level in interacting with their teams. The Survey is a 360° feedback tool. That is, leaders not only evaluate themselves but may also receive feedback from the team members they lead, their peers, and/or their managers. 

Leaders will learn useful information about themselves, recognize some of their strengths, identify some areas they want to change, and commit to specific action plans to aid in their development. In addition, the entire survey process can open the lines of communication between the leader and others in the organization.

Development 

The Team Leader Survey was developed through research with self-managing team leaders. A job analysis provided the starting point for the project. The research was conducted with a manufacturing organization in the Southwestern United States. The leaders participating in the project were the equivalent of middle managers and first-level supervisors in traditional organizations.

Participants in the project identified the most critical leadership components and rated them on several dimensions. Then additional research was conducted to broaden that analysis to various industries and regions of the country. Over 100 individuals from diverse industries and backgrounds analyzed the identified skills and suggested new skills.

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