Negotiating Skills



Negotiating Style Profile

The Negotiating Style Profile is a win-win, collaborative negotiating assessment for employee and management development training to improve negotiating skills. The assessment identifies a preference for 1 of 5 negotiating styles based on the William Ury and Roger Fisher’s win-win model of negotiating, and the Thomas-Kilmann conflict resolution model.
Negotiating is a skill that everyone can use, regardless of whether or not it is part of a formal job requirement. One of the challenges, though, is that not everyone negotiates in the same way. We each have a personal negotiating style that influences how we approach and engage the process. By being aware of their negotiating style, individuals will be in a better position to acquire good negotiating skills.

The Negotiating Style Profile is a great starting point. Based on Ury and Fisher’s collaborative win-win model, and heavily influenced by the Kilmann-Thomas conflict resolution model, The Negotiating Style Profile offers a simple framework for determining one’s negotiating style and the likely effect of that style in a negotiating situation. Both professionals and non-professionals will find the Negotiating Style Profile to be a valuable tool for improving negotiating skills. First, individuals identify their preference for 1 of 5 negotiating styles: Defeating, Accommodating, Collaborating, Withdrawing, or Compromising. Next, observer feedback provides valuable insight from peers. Finally, they learn how to use this knowledge to focus on the skills and methods that are likely to produce synergistic outcomes. LEARN more ay HRDQ,
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Negotiating Style Profile

Learning Outcomes: Understand 5 styles of negotiating. Identify personal negotiating characteristics. Learn why a win-win approach is most effective. Gather peer feedback about one’s negotiating style. Theory and Development :

The Model of Negotiating Styles at the center of Negotiating Style Profile is based on relevant literature on negotiating practices, including Getting to Yes, by Roger Fisher and William Ury. These sources reveal that concerns for both the outcome of the negotiation and for the relationship appear to represent the most important behaviors a negotiator can employ in an actual negotiation. The Negotiating Style Profile also references the research of Thomas and Kilmann (1976) because the negotiating model bears similarities to the conflict resolution process, which suggests that a particular resolutions style can be predicted based upon a person’s willingness to confront issues and willingness to see all points of view. The Thomas-Kilmann model describes five pure styles for conflict resolution. This same approach can be used to describe the five styles of negotiating behavior. Drawing from the literature on conflict resolution, it is clear that a negotiator cannot be effective in both the short and long terms if he or she emphasizes one set of concerns to the exclusion of the other.

Although variations of each of the 5 Characteristic Negotiating Styles may be appropriate under certain conditions, it is suggested that a consistent application of the Collaborate style offers the greatest probability of producing the highest quality negotiating results and the most enduring satisfaction to the parties involved.
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Salary and Sales Negotiation Training: Reading Body Language There's a lot to learn in sales negotiation training, but nothing can beat knowing the other party's position. Learning to read body language can give you that edge.
Wouldn't it be great to know whether or not your fellow negotiator is pressured for time? Whether or not they're telling the truth, when they say that they can 'go no further'?

But that's not all.

Negotiating experts say that you'll get better result with the other person you're negotiating with, if they like you.
Well, body language comes to the rescue yet again! If you're able to recognize the negotiator's special moves, intonations, and body posture... you can mimic them. From the other side of the table, they'll then see someone they like. They'll see themselves.
This section will provide you with the body language skills to see their true intentions, and mimic their body language to get them to come on the same wavelength as you..
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Sales Negotiation Training: Reading Body language


Many of us negotiate every day, both in business and personal interactions. All of these negotiations involve 2 critical factors: the outcome and the relationship that exists between the negotiators. In an increasingly fast-paced and competitive marketplace, we can’t afford to jeopardize either. For building the skill set needed to foster partnerships and achieve favorable agreements, NegotiatingSuccess™ is the solution.

Based on the well-known collaborative model of negotiating behavior, this powerful 2-day program takes the fear out of negotiating, helping individuals to prepare for negotiations, find creative solutions to tough problems, work through personal style differences, and build relationships with negotiating partners.

Learning Outcomes: Learn and practice the collaborative discussion model for negotiating. Discover one’s negotiating style and compare it to other styles. Learn how to prepare quickly and accurately for any negotiation. Improve the interpersonal skills needed to support a collaborative negotiating style. Develop the ability to problem solve with difficult negotiators. Discover one’s communication style and learn how to adapt it to other styles. Create a personal action plan for improving negotiating skills NegotiatingSuccess includes all the materials you need to conduct a powerful learning event — from pre-work to participant and facilitator support materials. Every HRDQ Program offers just the right mix of interactive tools, helping participants learn compelling concepts, reflect on relevant experiences, and practice new skills.
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Dealing with Tough Negotiators

Many of us negotiate every day, both in business and personal interactions. All of these negotiations involve 2 critical factors: the outcome and the relationship that exists between the negotiators. In an increasingly fast-paced and competitive marketplace, we can’t afford to jeopardize either. For building the skill set needed to foster partnerships and achieve favorable agreements, NegotiatingSuccess™ is the solution.
Based on the well-known collaborative model of negotiating behavior, this powerful 2-day program takes the fear out of negotiating, helping individuals to prepare for negotiations, find creative solutions to tough problems, work through personal style differences, and build relationships with negotiating partners.

Learning Outcomes:
Learn and practice the collaborative discussion model for negotiating Discover one’s negotiating style and compare it to other styles. Learn how to prepare quickly and accurately for any negotiation. Improve the interpersonal skills needed to support a collaborative negotiating style. Develop the ability to problem solve with difficult negotiators. Discover one’s communication style and learn how to adapt it to other styles. Create a personal action plan for improving negotiating skills. NegotiatingSuccess includes all the materials you need to conduct a powerful learning event — from pre-work to participant and facilitator support materials. Every HRDQ Program offers just the right mix of interactive tools, helping participants learn compelling concepts, reflect on relevant experiences, and practice new skills.

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You can't turn a tough negotiator into a collaborative, problem-solving partner. But you can achieve win-win outcomes if you apply the right negotiating techniques. HRDQ's Dealing with Tough Negotiators series will help your negotiators develop the skills they need. This 30-item assessment helps respondents identify their areas of strength and weakness in 5 key negotiating skill areas: Maintaining Composure, Developing Data, Refocusing the Discussion, Being Creative, and Handling Information Strategically.
Learning Outcomes: Learn 5 key skills for dealing with tough negotiations. Identify strengths and weaknesses in 5 skill areas. Practice handling tough negotiations. Understand how to enable win-win solutions with tough negotiators. Theory

Dealing with Tough Negotiators is based on a study of the relevant literature and the Model of Negotiating Behavior. The literature on collaborative negotiating points to 5 skills that move a negotiation back to constructive, objective discussion. These skills prepare the collaborative negotiator for both offense (proactive collaboration) and defense (wariness, solid research, and constant questioning).

The 5 negotiating skills are:

Maintaining Composure
Developing Data
Refocusing the Discussion
Being Creative
Handling Information Strategically
How It Works

How It Works

With a particular situation and difficult negotiator in mind, participants respond to the 30 statements on the assessment. Participants then learn about the Model of Negotiating Behavior, score the assessment, and chart the results for each of the 5 negotiating skill sets. Interpretive information provides insight on scores and thought-provoking questions help participants think of ways to practice the 5 skills. Following the assessment, the Dealing with Tough Negotiators Workbook offers practice in applying the skills with the help of examples, prepared questions, and guidelines — the perfect tool for negotiators who are about to enter into a particularly difficult negotiation.

Uses for Dealing with Tough Negotiators
Both the Assessment and the Workbook are written for negotiators who have at least some negotiating experience. (For inexperienced negotiators, we suggest the Negotiating Style Profile or the Negotiating Win-Win Solutions workshop as an introduction to basic, collaborative negotiating.)
Effective as stand-alone instruments or as part of a negotiating program, the Dealing with Tough Negotiators series helps negotiators who:

Are about to enter into a particularly difficult negotiation. Routinely face tough negotiating partners. Have become set in their negotiating tactics and need a refresher. Are familiar with collaborative negotiation, but lack the means to achieve it.
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Negotiating Win-Win Solutions

When it comes to negotiating, being “nice” doesn’t have to mean losing — or being the only one to benefit, either. In a world where we’ve been trained and rewarded to compete and win, the Negotiating Win-Win Solutions program attempts to reverse the win-lose perspective and provide a problem-solving approach to negotiation that helps each person involved in the negotiation to walk away feeling like a winner.

Negotiating Win-Win Solutions gives participants a framework for conducting collaborative negotiations. Using an interactive format that includes an assessment, a hands-on game, and small group activities, participants learn about negotiating styles and practice a 5-step “win-win” formula to achieve the best outcomes.

Learning Outcomes:Pinpoint one’s typical negotiating style. Understand the 5 negotiating styles. Learn 5 factors to consider when preparing for any negotiation. Develop the essential interpersonal skills to use for collaborative negotiating. Apply the skills of collaborative negotiating to real-life situations.

Theory;

Negotiating Win-Win Solutions is based on a collaborative model of negotiating. The workshop shows the influences of relevant literature on negotiating practices, including Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In by Roger Fisher and William Ury.

How It Works:

The program gives participants a well-rounded learning experience, balancing facilitator instruction with group interaction and private reflection. Through a combination of HRDQ tools including an assessment, a hands-on game, and small group activities, participants gain insight and practice collaborative negotiating skills. The session culminates with action planning — helping participants to apply the learning to actual work-related situations.

Uses for Program:

Negotiating Win-Win Solutions is appropriate for individuals at all levels who are involved in typical negotiations.

The program’s flexible training design allows facilitators to present Negotiating Win-Win Solutions in one day or 2 half-days, or combine the program with other training sessions to create an expanded learning experience.
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Common Currency Game

Common Currency Game

Is it really possible to practice the strategies of competition and cooperation at the same time? Yes! Around the world, production teams, research and development groups, and marketing teams all are benefiting from the power of cooperative-competition. Discover for yourself this fresh approach to individual, team, and organizational development with Common Currency: The Cooperative Competition Game.
Overview;
What is cooperative-competition? When teams act with a competitive spirit that motivates them to put forth their best efforts while cooperating on the achievement of similar goals, you’ve got cooperative-competition. And it can give your organization an edge over the competition. Common Currency uses the concept of cooperative-competition among teams to stress the importance of group interdependence. To win this game, each group must rely on collaboration with others to exchange information and resources. Thus, teams gain an understanding of the beneficial nature of competitiveness as they strive to do their best, while maintaining good working relationships with other groups.
All group interactions involve both task (outcome) and relationship (process) skills. Common Currency is an excellent tool to address all aspects of teamwork and strategic planning, including leadership development, open communication, conflict resolution, principled negotiation, problem solving, managing change, and decision making.
How the game works:

Teams representing fictional countries must cooperate in trading coins and information while competing for the most valuable combination of coins.
Participants will:
Learn the basic principles of cooperative-competition. Discover how cooperative-competition helps teams and individuals achieve the greatest results. Develop the team and interpersonal skills that drive cooperative-competition. Understand how cooperative-competition benefits the entire organization. Change Variation Game
The concept of change and how it affects the process of cooperative competition can be illustrated clearly with this variation. The basic game instructions remain the same; however, teams must deal with changes in some of the original information. The new Information Cards affect coin combinations, bonus points, and the total number of coins allowed in the final collection. At this time, the change variation is included with the basic Common Currency game at no charge.

When to use Common Currency

This game is a flexible, team-based activity that utilizes a wealth of interpersonal and group-process skills. We especially like using it as part of negotiating and strategic planning workshops. But it’s ideal for a wide array of training topics. The Facilitator Guide includes debriefs for training in team building, communication, negotiating, strategic planning, decision making, problem solving, resource sharing, and more. Also included is a separate change module, which demonstrates the value of cooperative-competition in times of change.

Development of the Game

The idea for Common Currency came about as the author was exploring the effects of competition on team building. She discovered that very few people were aware of the beneficial nature of competition within a collaborative environment, so she decided to create a game that would demonstrate those benefits.
The challenge was to create a game that utilized the spirit of cooperative competition while remaining flexible enough to meet a variety of training needs. The most important issue during development was the use of limited resources to create a heightened sense of competition, while utilizing a process that would require teams to collaborate with each other. This was accomplished in two ways: first, by providing an unequal distribution of coins, with a decreasing amount of coins as the values increased; and second, by formulating several data "bits" about the coins in the form of Information Cards, which players would need to access to determine game strategies. The cards were made in duplicate to incorporate the risk of negotiating for information that was already known.

To further limit these resources, the coins and cards were to be randomly distributed in small portions to each participating group. Therefore, teams would have diverse assortments of coin values and pieces of information. In an attempt to gain the most valuable coin collection, participants would need to cooperate within their own team as well as negotiate with other groups for information and coins. The resulting interactions would establish the basis for the debriefing topics.
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Building Negotiating Power

Building Negotiating Power
Reinforce the principles of collaborative negotiation with the informative and easy-to-read article. Step by step, readers will learn what it takes to become a collaborative negotiator – and how to avoid the most common negotiating pitfalls.

Participants will learn the benefits of collaborative negotiating style, the 6 rules of successful negotiation, how to handle conflict, and how to handle conflict, and how to ensure satisfactory follow-through. learn more at HRDQ now.Click here to visit HRDQ



Strike fighter

Simulated negotiation. Real-world skills.Strike fighter.

If you think negotiations are a battle to be won, imagine this… You know firsthand what the Air Service needs in its aircraft – heck, you’ve flown the covert operations yourself. Now, as the military Commander of the Air Service, you’re about to take part in the most challenging mission of all: a top-secret meeting with the Heads of the Land and Sea Services to replace an aging fleet of strike fighter jets with just a single model. While you want to fight for the sole interests of the Air Service, you know it could cause you to win the battle… but lose the war. Instead, you must engage your well-honed negotiating skills and collaborate.

Practice makes perfect.
Before the people in your organization attempt to maneuver through real-world negotiations, give them the opportunity to practice their skills in the safety of the classroom with the action-packed simulation, Strike Fighter. The winner of the NASAGA game design competition, this learning-rich experience is aimed at helping individuals become more competent and confident negotiators by teaching a solid start-to-finish strategy. There isn’t a more powerful way to surface strengths and weaknesses, and answer the question: Is the way I approach negotiating successful, and if not, what do I need to change?

Learning Outcomes

Practice the negotiation process and reflect upon their negotiating skills

Understand and explain the characteristics of the five main negotiating styles: Defeat, Withdraw, Accommodate, Compromise, and Collaborate

Reassess and improve upon their negotiating style

Create a personal action plan for improving their negotiating skills

Uses for the Simulation

Strike Fighter is effective as a stand-alone activity or as part of a more comprehensive training program. Here are some suggested applications for the simulation:

Introduction to the concept of collaborative negotiating. An experiential follow up to the Negotiating Style Profile assessment. Basic negotiating skills practice. Preparation exercise for sales people or purchasing agents.Team building activity for teams that need to collaborate. What to Order

The Strike Fighter Complete Kit provides you with everything you need to train up to 48 people, including a comprehensive Facilitator Guide, card decks, worksheets, and more. Our Client Solutions Team is happy to assist you in determining your materials needs. Go to HRDQ store now.

If you are new to Strike Fighter, we highly recommend HRDQ QuickStart Training, whether you are a novice trainer or a seasoned facilitator. It’s an excellent way to quickly get up to speed on the simulation so you can step into your first training class with confidence. Personalized, one-on-one telephone coaching is provided at your convenience. Our subject matter experts will review Strike Fighter with you, offer ideas for tailoring the game to your specific needs, discuss typical participant questions and reactions, and more.

Pracownia Gier Szkoleniowych (PGS)

PGS designs, develops, and facilitates management development games and business simulations for both global corporations and the non-profit sector. With more than two dozen experts on board, PGS specializes in the fields of change management, communication, and teambuilding.

About NASAGA and the Game Design Competition

The North American Simulation and Gaming Association (NASAGA) is a community trainers, educators, game designers, coaches and facilitators who focus on the design and implementation of serious games, simulations, and other experiential activities. In 2009, they introduced the Game Design Competition at their annual conference in Washington, D.C. The purpose of the competition is to encourage and reward innovation in game design and application:
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